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Motorola patents an autonomous car that can arrest you

Staff Contributor

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We bring you a peculiar case. Of those that make you wonder why someone would be interested in inventing this kind of thing. It is an autonomous car patented by Motorola, which would be able to arrest its passengers.

The description might sound absurd. But, according to public patent records, discovered by JWZ colleagues; we find ourselves with an autonomous patrol vehicle for the police. Which can analyze the detainees in it.

It is well thought of and strange. But technically the autonomous car would work like this:

The suspect is arrested and put into the police car.
There the intelligent equipment of the vehicle is used.
A quick breathalyzer test is applied to the devices themselves.
A screen reads your rights to the detainee.
A smart assistant allows you to contact your lawyer.
You can even link a video conference with your defender
You can make online payment of fines and penalties to release the detainee.
And as appropriate, the autonomous car can only drive itself. To take the prisoner to jail, his house, the police station; or where appropriate.
In effect, this smart patrol does practically all the work of a policeman. And that may sound very attractive to the authorities.

However, it remains a mere patent. And it may be years before we see this toy in

Springfield Daily is a local news, sports, entertainment, politics site with live streams and video content. Our Staff Contributors create, post, and curate content on a regular basis. For questions or comments regarding our stories, email us at: contact@SpringfieldDaily.com

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This IBM drone can bring you coffee when you need it

Francisco Saravia

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The answer is: always.

Can you imagine a world where, without having to ask for it, a drone brings you coffee? IBM takes you into account.

It happens that the giant technology company has patented the idea of a drone with quite fantastic capabilities.

This is the idea: you are in the office, pass the coffee drone and through a gesture with your hand or with an application, you have it bring you a coffee. Up there all fantastic and quite futuristic Right?

But IBM wants to go further because they describe a system with the help of biometric sensors and cameras to “perceive if someone is in a premeditated cognitive state of requiring coffee.”

In simple words, the drone will know if you need a good cup of coffee and will bring it to you if you estimate it within its parameters.

According to Investopedia, IBM has said it can serve in factories or offices to keep its employees alert.

But there is a problem, the coffee would be boiling and the oscillations of a drone could spill the precious liquid. IBM thought about that and the patent describes an entire anti-spill system with plastic bags.

When will it happen? Maybe soon, maybe never. According to the same source, IBM is the company that introduces patents the most, so it can be crazy and nothing more.

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Did you use this app on Facebook? Maybe your data was stolen

Francisco Saravia

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The data of at least four million Facebook users could have been compromised by the use of an application.

Again? Yes again; although we talked about something that could have happened simultaneously with the “robbery” of Cambridge Analytica. Ime Archibong; who is the product vice president of Facebook; reported that the social network had to remove the application “MyPersonality”.

This app assured to tell you what your true personality was. As well as many on Facebook, well. But at the same time, your data was being stolen.

Facebook says goodbye to “MyPersonality”

The application in question was active since 2012 and was used by around four million users around the world. This is what Archibong said:

It is clear that they shared personal information with researchers and other companies that limitedly protected users’ data

Facebook will get in touch with those people who might have been affected; so if you used the app, stay tuned. Although there is a big difference with the Cambrigde Analytica case: this time they only stole the data of the person who accessed the app and not their friends as well.

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Remember the Nintendo gun you used to kill ducks with? This is how it really works

Francisco Saravia

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The Nintendo Zapper was legendary and yes, many people around the world had it. But, really, how did it work?

Surely you remember the legendary game Duck Hunt from Nintendo. Over there, in those times of happiness and innocence when we were children; This game was one of the best and almost mandatory for all the owners of an NES.

The idea was revolutionary for the time. You pointed a gun at the TV and you had to kill the ducks that flew out of the bushes. If you failed, a dog made fun of you (public enemy number one). Good; Well now we know a little more about how the Zapper gun worked and maybe you’re disappointed.

That bad aim in Nintendo’s Duck Hunt might not be your fault

You aimed and fired, but the unfortunate ducks simply did not fall fulminated. But how, if you had aimed directly at them! Well, everything could be part of the “bugs” that had the rudimentary technology.

The reality was that that gun did not emit any signal when you pulled the trigger; and instead, it was functional thanks to light changes.  It used a semiconductor sensitive to infrared or visible light (photodiode) and thus detected the light coming from the screen of your TV although all this could not be seen by your simple mortal eyes.

This was the method: when you fired (remember that the gun was connected to the console); the screen went black and only allowed to see the white “shadow” of the ducks (again, all this was imperceptible to your eyes). A) Yes; when you aimed at the white figures (which were the ducks) and fired, the Zapper was able to capture the return of light. And that’s how it knew you had hit the duck.

So, yes: Nintendo’s gun did not send signals; but it received changes of light. Any light … in fact, it did not even matter if it was the light of the duck or not.

Yes, it was a simple technology; But it made us happy in those years.

 

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