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Illinois is not among the states offering a “back-to-school” sales tax holiday

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Illinois is not among the states offering a “back-to-school” sales tax holiday this year.

Seventeen states will hold some form of a tax holiday in 2018, down from a peak of 19 states in 2010. Some supporters argue the temporary reduction spurs spending and saves consumers money. Jesse Hathaway, research fellow for budget and tax policy at the Heartland Institute, said that doesn’t end up happening.

“Tax holidays don’t boost the sales overall, they don’t increase economic growth,” Hathaway said. “However, they do increase the cost of compliance with tax rules. They add to the complexity.”

A 2017 study by Federal Reserve researchers shows that consumers don’t typically spend more because of the tax holiday. Instead, they simply shift the timing of purchases to the period in which the sales tax is eliminated.

Illinois last held a tax holiday in 2010. State Sen. Dave Syverson, R-Rockford, voted against the proposal at the time and notes the results weren’t encouraging.

“The weekend we had the sales tax holiday, the advertisements were for 30-percent off school supplies,” Syverson said. “The following two weekends, the advertisements were 40-percent and 50-percent off. The stores knew it was a no-tax weekend, so they artificially kept the prices even higher. Individuals thought they were getting a deal, but they actually were paying more.”

Syverson said a proposal to continue the tax holiday was defeated in 2011, though the idea is discussed just about every year in Springfield.

“It makes for nice headlines, and it makes them look like they’re populists,” Syverson said. “But most of these people are the same lawmakers who have been raising taxes on everyone.”

Hathaway said the temporary nature of the tax relief distracts both residents and officials from addressing the bigger issue.

“If lawmakers really want to save money for consumers and help people keep more of their money, then they should be reducing the sales tax rate not just on one weekend, but year-round. It should be a lower tax rate that covers more things that is fair to everybody.”

Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin all offer some form of a sales tax holiday in the month of August.

Article by Scot Bertram, for more news visit ILnews.org

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Illinois News Network, publisher of ILNews.org, is a nonpartisan, nonprofit media company dedicated to the principles of transparency, accountability, and fiscal responsibility in the state of Illinois. INN is Illinois’ pioneering non-profit news brand, offering content from the statehouse and beyond to Illinoisans through their local media of choice and from their digital hub at ILNews.org. Springfield Daily was granted republishing permission by INN.

Education

Illinois unveiling a new model of accountability to divvy up federal money for schools

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Illinois’ education officials are set to unveil new metrics that will decide how much local school districts could receive in federal school improvement funds.

Using the new support and accountability model that’s planned to be released at the end of the month, schools that are struggling could receive $150,000 in Title I federal funds for school improvement, plus additional funds based on enrollment and state and local funding levels in the current school year. Some of those funds would have already been distributed earlier this year, officials said.

Rae Clementz, ISBE’s Director of Assessment and Accountability, said the new accountability and support metrics will provide insight for school officials and the public.

“It helps us depict a better, richer picture of the many ways in which schools are doing wonderful things,” she said.

Much of the new accountability and support model will be based on student data gleaned from PARCC, the acronym for Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers. Officials said that, while the test was not going to be conducted, the content would still be delivered and used to measure growth via an Illinois assessment of readiness.

PARCC received criticism from parents and administrators alike for long periods of testing.

One statistic that’s going to be factored in is chronic absenteeism, which measures students missing class for any reason, not just truancy.

“Chronic absenteeism highlights students that may otherwise go unnoticed in average attendance,” Clementz said.

Absenteeism figures will be higher than chronic truancy, which only measures unexcused absences. In the 2015 school year, the most recent year for which data was available, 335,094 Illinois students missed at least 10 percent of their school days. This is what advocacy group Attendance Works classifies as “chronically absent.”

Patrick Payne, director of Data Strategies and Analytics with ISBE said there will also be new information on teacher quality released, measuring certain credentials and “the number of inexperienced teachers.”

The new measurements will not affect the state’s school funding formula that went into effect this year.

Article by Cole Lauterbach with Illinois News Network. For more INN News visit ILnews.org

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UIS to hold Bicentennial “History Harvest”

Thomas Clatterbuck

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What connects you or your family to Illinois? If you have photographs, letters, documents, or objects that connect you to Illinois, you can bring them to the History Harvest to be digitized. Students from UIS will scan, photograph, and otherwise digitize your items to become part of their bicentennial collection. After the harvest is complete, there will be an online collection of the items brought in. You get to keep your items. Once the digitization is done, you can go home with your items.

The event is free and open to the public. If you have an item you consider historic in relation to Illinois, bring it in. The History Harvest will take place at Innovate Springfield, at the corner of 5th and Adam on the Old State Capitol Plaza. Doors open at 10 AM and will go until 2 PM.

To see the results of the 2016 History Harvest, check out the online collection. For more information, visit www.uis.edu/history/historyharvest/ or contact Devin Hunter at 217/206-7432 (dhunte2@uis.edu) or Kenneth Owen at 217/206-7439 (kowen8@uis.edu).

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Education

District 186 unveils Phase One of “Our Schools, Our Future” master plan

Thomas Clatterbuck

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proposed improvements to SHS

The “Our Schools, Our Future” plan took another step forward with the release of the Master Plan document. “Our Schools, Our Future” is the comprehensive facilities plan for District 186. Complied over years of research and nine community engagement events, this plan lays out a long-range vision for the district’s buildings and campuses.

After reviewing the feedback from last’s years community engagement events, the district has released the Phase 1 for implementing their vision. The plan lists proposed improvements at 33 district facilities over the next ten to twelve years. Some of the changes are small. Enos Elementary was allocated just $41,000 for security upgrades. But most of the improvements are quite substantial. Schools like Fairview Elementary and Washington Middle School are being expanded to replace the modular classrooms that they currently rely on. Springfield High and Lanphier High Schools are both slated for “comprehensive reconstruction.” The high school projects will cost over $40 million each. In total, there are more than $190 million in planned improvements around the district.

How will it be paid for?

The district is looking at a number of ways of paying for these projects. Some of it can be covered by “Health Life Safety” (HLS) funding. HLS funds can only be used for specific projects; typically those necessary for the safety of students and faculty. But the district is really pinning their hopes on the proposed sales tax increase. Districts in Sangamon County have called for a one percent sales tax increase to be used for facilities improvements. Money raised from the tax will be distributed to districts in the county on a per capita basis. That question will be on the November ballot.

You can learn more about the “Our Schools, Our Future” plan and leave feedback on the district’s website, or click here to read the Phase One plan.

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