Connect with us

Local

Jacksonville Police Department plans upgrades with major savings

Thomas Clatterbuck

Published

on

The City of Jacksonville got some good budgetary news at last night’s city council meeting. Police Chief Adam Mefford came to the council to discuss a major grant from the Illinois Law Enforcement Training Standards Board. That grant is for $45,000 to upgrade the force’s vehicle cameras. The initial grant alone would be a major boon for the city, but it also leads to other cost savings as well.

Body and vehicle cameras are an important tool for police accountability. Having a video record helps protect both the public and officers. But implementing these systems is expensive. There are obvious upfront costs for the cameras themselves. Yet the real costs come from storing the footage. Every officer has multiple hours of footage per day, every day. This footage must be secure and accessible for years into the future. The storage systems that can handle this are expensive.

This is where the grant really saves the city money. Mefford said that the new grant will allow for the purchase of a new server for these cameras. However, this server is compatible with other planned improvement projects for the interview rooms at the station. By having one server for both jobs, the cost of the second project is tens of thousands of dollars lower. So not only does the grant free up the funds to make the other planned improvement project possible, it also makes the project much cheaper. This translates into thousands of dollars in savings for the taxpayers in Jacksonville.

The one catch is that the deadline for the grant is quickly approaching. Given the obvious benefits to the city, the council had no issue giving Mefford permission to ensure he was able to receive the grant.

In other city business, the Heritage Cultural Center account was closed and the funds were transferred to their new account. The Cultural Center never operated with city funds, but it did use the city’s tax ID code. Now that they have their own code, the city no longer needs to hold their money. There were no substantive changes to the funds or the center.

Print Page

Senior strategist, statehouse reporter and political correspondent for Springfield Daily. Graduate of District 117 and UIS. Thomas covers stories in both Morgan and Sangamon Counties, as well as statewide politics.

Live

LIVE | Police and Fire budget workshop presentations

Staff Contributor

Published

on

Follow along live with the Springfield City Council budget workshops. The police and fire departments will be highlighting their successes from 2018, and presenting their FY20 budgets.

Continue Reading

Live

LIVE | Springfield City Council Meeting January 15

Staff Contributor

Published

on

Follow along live with the Springfield City Council meeting for January 15th. The purchase of several vehicles for the fire department will be discussed.

Continue Reading

Live

LIVE | First Springfield Budget Workshop for FY20

Staff Contributor

Published

on

Follow along live with budget workshop for FY20. This first session will include an overview and then budgets presented by the Treasurer; City Clerk; City Council; Mayor’s Office, and Lincoln Library.

Continue Reading

Sponsored Ad

Sponsored

Trending

[embedsocial_stories_popup id="4a0e77961a73a7758afee3caea4e621a89b255c1"]