Connect with us
Thomas Clatterbuck

Published

on

Lot rents are going up in two Jacksonville trailer parks. Renting is a businesses, and their costs go up every year just like everyone else’s. When rents rose by eight percent a year and a half ago, tenants saw it as normal economics. But on August 1st, rents at Prairie Knolls and Rolling Acres will be going up again. Not by eight percent, but by upwards of 80 percent. At Rolling Acres, the new lot rent will be $365 per month, up from $195. Legally, Time Out Communities, who now own the park, are allowed to raise the rents with proper notice.

The Town Hall

Last night, nearly 100 park residents and other members of the Jacksonville community gathered at Lincoln Avenue Baptist Church to discuss the situation and brainstorm about what could be done. Organizers Ron Hoffstadt and Danny Davison have made a counter offer of a ten percent increase with a two year lease, followed by another ten percent increase after that. They said that this would give residents time to plan for future increases or sell their homes and move out. Many residents also took the opportunity to share their experiences. In addition to the rent increases, they expressed frustration with a perceived general lack of maintenance in the parks.

But to actually stop the increase, they would need a lawyer and a judge. If the residents could get a hearing, the judge could issue an injunction to stop the increases. However, these individuals would need to work on a pro-bono basis, because the residents cannot afford legal representation.

There are few other options available to the residents. Increasing rates is perfectly legal. Even the Time Out Communities’ resistance to offering two year leases is only a minor legal issue. The $365 rate could be implemented via the lease with little trouble from a legal perspective.

State Representative C. D. Davidsmeyer (R-100) shared his frustration with the limited options the residents have. In comments very similar to the city council’s on Monday, he said the law is what it is; and the law allows the rates to be raised this way. Davidsmeyer did say that it was likely that reform efforts would enjoy bipartisan support in the General Assembly. But even then, he said they would not be back in session until after the November election.

Why not just move?

If the residents do not want to pay the increased rents, why don’t they just relocate? Ironically, having a “mobile home” usually makes relocation harder rather than easier. Trailers are not nearly a mobile as their name would suggest. Moving them is a very expensive undertaking. It costs around $5,000 just to connect a trailer to a truck that can move it, not counting any additional costs of the relocation. Homes often have two trailers, doubling these costs. These costs make moving a difficult proposition for those residents on fixed incomes who would struggle to pay the new rent. They can’t afford to stay and they can’t afford to leave.

But other challenges await those who can afford to relocate. Time Out Communities has purchased many of the trailer parks in Morgan and Sangamon Counties. The same dramatic rent increases are likely in all of the parks run by Time Out Communities. As one woman put it, there’s no where for them to go.

So what’s going to happen?

The residents have gathered support from many local leaders. Rep. Davidsmeyer, the City Council, a coalition of Pastors, as well as other local citizens have all spoken in sympathy of their plight. But unless the residents can get a pro bono lawyer and judge to take their case, the rent increases will probably be implemented August 1st. Hoffstadt and Davison said they will continue to organize and petition, but they are just running out of time.

Davison has been passing a petition to get a more reasonable increase put in place, and is continuing to gather signatures. The hope being that public pressure may cause Time Out Communities to reconsider their rates. That petition can be signed at the American Legion Post at 903 W. Superior in Jacksonville.

You can watch the full meeting in the player above.

Senior strategist, statehouse reporter and political correspondent for Springfield Daily. Graduate of District 117 and UIS. Thomas covers stories in both Morgan and Sangamon Counties, as well as statewide politics.

Business

Court upholds Illinois nuclear power subsidy law

Published

on

A federal appellate court ruling upheld Illinois’ law directing hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidies to nuclear plants and other green energy incentives.

The ruling from the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals says that Illinois’ Future Energy Jobs Act, a 2016 law providing Zero Emissions Credits to Exelon, the owner of several nuclear plants in the state, doesn’t unfairly manipulate the multi-state energy market that establishes rates.

The challenge was brought by the Electric Power Supply Association, a trade group for power plant owners that includes Dynegy, which has since been acquired by Vistra Energy. Vistra owns coal-fired plants in Illinois. Vistra wasn’t immediately available to respond to the ruling or say whether it will appeal the decision.

In Vistra’s lawsuit, the company claimed the subsidies allowed Exelon to submit unfairly low rates in the wholesale auction.

The panel ruled that “the Commerce Clause does not cut the states off from legislating on all subjects relating to the health, life, and safety of their citizens…”

Exelon released a statement Friday saying the company was “pleased to see that the Seventh Circuit Court affirmed dismissal of the ZEC complaint, thus supporting the continued operation of Illinois’ ZEC program and the clean, resilient and affordable electricity nuclear power provides.”

State Rep. Sue Rezin, R-Morris, who has two nuclear plants in her district, said it was good for clean and renewable energy.

“Many states are trying to figure out what to do to keep the nuclear plants online,” she said. “This opinion that just came out sounds like a step in the right direction.”

Both sides had said Illinois jobs were on the line as they looked to influence lawmakers.

Exelon warned in 2016 that it would likely have to close two Illinois plants, one near Clinton and another near the Quad Cities, and cut 1,500 jobs if the subsidies weren’t signed into law.

Dynegy said its Illinois-based plants face an uncertain future if the courts upheld the FEJA. This would mean 1,000 jobs in southern Illinois, an area facing a dearth of higher-paying jobs.

The Future Energy Jobs Act will charge utility customers an average of $2 per month over the next decade, sending $236 million to Exelon annually. In turn for the credits, ComEd, Exelon’s energy retailer, would invest in green jobs training and provide discounts to needy ratepayers.

Article by Cole Lauterbach with Illinois News Network. For more INN News visit ILnews.org

Continue Reading

Business

Davis, LaHood Announce Four USDOT Grants Investing in Local Airport Infrastructure

Staff Contributor

Published

on

PRESS RELEASE | U.S. Reps. Rodney Davis (R-Ill.) and Darin LaHood (R-Ill.) announced today that the U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded four local central Illinois airports with funding to invest in various projects ranging from runway rehabilitation, the purchase for ground operation equipment, and expansion of passenger terminals. Statements from the Congressmen, as well as details of the awards are below:

“Investing in our infrastructure is a critical part of growing our economy and that’s exactly what these grants will accomplish,” said Davis. “These four regional airports are essential to bringing economic opportunity to central Illinois and these grants will allow them to make necessary upgrades to improve service and safety. As someone who frequently flies in and out of central Illinois airports, I understand how important these continued investments are and I know my constituents will benefit greatly from these improvements.”

“Today is a great day for our local airports across central Illinois. With the latest awards from the U.S. Department of Transportation, these three local airports across central Illinois will have the ability to reconstruct runways, purchase new equipment to make ground operations smoother and safer during inclement winter weather, and expand a passenger terminal to improve the flow of passengers,” stated LaHood. “Air travel is a key economic driver for our local communities and I applaud the USDOT for their continued commitment to investing in our local transportation projects to help make travel safer, as well as more effective and efficient.”

The awards:

Central Illinois Regional Airport – $991,773
This project acquires one new and one replacement high-speed runway broom to keep the airport serviceable during snow periods and aid in the efficiency and safety of operations.

Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport – $1,995,173

This project expands the terminal building to approximately 6,100 square feet to meet Federal Aviation Administration design standards and enable efficient movement of passengers. Earlier this year in June, both LaHood and Davis announced that the Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport received $4.6 million in terminal upgrades. This grant is being increased from $4,628,998 to $6,625,171 and will allow for the final phase of upgrades to be completed.

Logan County Airport – $1,153,190
This grant includes discretionary funding for Logan County Airport to rehabilitate Runway 3/21

Decatur Airport – $1,567,562

This grant includes discretionary funding for Decatur Airport to rehabilitate Runway 6/24

Continue Reading

Business

Rauner declares harvest emergency as stopgap until higher haul limits take effect next year

Published

on

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner signed an emergency declaration Friday to allow increased weight limits for Illinois agriculture haulers on Illinois roads.

Last month Rauner signed a law allowing permanently increased haul limits for permitted vehicles during harvest season, but that doesn’t take effect until Jan. 1. He said the declaration he signed Friday in Auburn at The Ladage Farm doesn’t have as much to do with the weather as it does with making Illinois farmers more competitive.

“The right answer for the permanent competitiveness of Illinois farmers is to make sure that our truckers and our commodities haulers and our farmers can get their product to market, fast, efficient, cost effectively,” Rauner said. “And 10 percent more weight now here in the fall can be on our commodities truckers going in.”

“That means every ten loads we’d have another load to haul so that’s gonna save us time and wear and tear and makes our harvest much quicker,” Ladage farm operator Brent Ladage said. “It adds up a lot, too.”

Illinois Farm Bureau’s Mark Reichert said the order and new law means trucks won’t have to vary their weights going from Illinois to neighboring states.

“So we’ve kind of mirrored now all of the states around, so there’s kind of an equilibrium now,” Reichert said.

Asked if possible increased wear and tear on local roads is an unfunded mandate on local taxpayers who pay to maintain the roads, Rauner he didn’t see that way.

“No, this is regulatory relief,” Rauner said. “This is cutting mandates, cutting regulations, which I’m all about. Eliminate as many regulations. This is freeing it up. There’s less regulatory restrictions now on our farmers.”

Rauner said fewer trucks on the road also diminishes wear and tear to roads that local taxpayers would have to maintain.

State Rep. Dave Severin, R-Benton, said increased haul limits also is about safety.

“Less vehicles on the road which is very important with school season now going and schools are back in session,” Severin said.

Starting Monday, haulers can request permits for increased limits from the Illinois Department of Transportation.

Article by Greg Bishop, Illinois News Network. For more INN News visit ILnews.org 

Continue Reading

Sponsored Ad

Sponsored

Trending