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Davis sponsors bill to reclaim unspent funds

Thomas Clatterbuck

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Authorizing spending is one of the chief powers of the legislature. The so called “power of the purse” lets Congress appropriate money to be spent by various agencies. These agencies then dutifully spend as much money as they are allowed. When there is a spending issue, it is normally that projects have overspent. But what happens in those cases when there is money left over? Where does the money go?

The answer is typically nowhere. Unspent money just sits waiting to be used. If the spending authority expires, then the money cannot be spent at all. HR 3 has identified over $15 billion in funds that either cannot be spent, or are not being spent.

Congressman Rodney Davis (R-13) said, “It’s just common sense that we rescind billions of taxpayer dollars that have gone years without being spent and in many cases can no longer be used because the authorizing authority has expired. An example of this is $523 million in energy loan guarantees program authorized as part of President Obama’s 800-billion-dollar stimulus bill that were not used and lapsed seven years ago.”

Sponsors of the bill stressed that it only impacts older appropriations and programs. It would not impact any funding authorized in the Fiscal Year 2018 Omnibus bill. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) stated that the bill would not affect CHIP payments to states over the 2018-2028 period.

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Senior strategist, statehouse reporter and political correspondent for Springfield Daily. Graduate of District 117 and UIS. Thomas covers stories in both Morgan and Sangamon Counties, as well as statewide politics.

Announcements

Southeast branch pickup is tomorrow

Staff Contributor

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Residents in the southeast quadrant are reminded to put out their branches tonight for the fall pickup. Branches need to be out by 6:00 AM to ensure they are picked up. The southeast quadrant is south of South Grand Avenue and east of Walnut Street, and includes the properties around Lake Springfield. This is the only scheduled branch pickup for the quadrant this fall.

You can also check out the city’s map to find out which quadrant you are in and other regulations about the pickup.

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Education

Illinois unveiling a new model of accountability to divvy up federal money for schools

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Illinois’ education officials are set to unveil new metrics that will decide how much local school districts could receive in federal school improvement funds.

Using the new support and accountability model that’s planned to be released at the end of the month, schools that are struggling could receive $150,000 in Title I federal funds for school improvement, plus additional funds based on enrollment and state and local funding levels in the current school year. Some of those funds would have already been distributed earlier this year, officials said.

Rae Clementz, ISBE’s Director of Assessment and Accountability, said the new accountability and support metrics will provide insight for school officials and the public.

“It helps us depict a better, richer picture of the many ways in which schools are doing wonderful things,” she said.

Much of the new accountability and support model will be based on student data gleaned from PARCC, the acronym for Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers. Officials said that, while the test was not going to be conducted, the content would still be delivered and used to measure growth via an Illinois assessment of readiness.

PARCC received criticism from parents and administrators alike for long periods of testing.

One statistic that’s going to be factored in is chronic absenteeism, which measures students missing class for any reason, not just truancy.

“Chronic absenteeism highlights students that may otherwise go unnoticed in average attendance,” Clementz said.

Absenteeism figures will be higher than chronic truancy, which only measures unexcused absences. In the 2015 school year, the most recent year for which data was available, 335,094 Illinois students missed at least 10 percent of their school days. This is what advocacy group Attendance Works classifies as “chronically absent.”

Patrick Payne, director of Data Strategies and Analytics with ISBE said there will also be new information on teacher quality released, measuring certain credentials and “the number of inexperienced teachers.”

The new measurements will not affect the state’s school funding formula that went into effect this year.

Article by Cole Lauterbach with Illinois News Network. For more INN News visit ILnews.org

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Health & Wellness

CDC: Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Infections Linked to Raw Chicken Products

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CDC | 92 people have been sickened in a recent outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella, including five in Illinois. 21 people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported. This outbreak is more worrisome because the Salmonella strains are resistant to several types of antibiotics.

No single source of contaminated chicken has been identified yet. The outbreak strain has been identified in samples taken from raw chicken pet food, raw chicken products, and live chickens. Because the outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis is present in live chickens and in many types of raw chicken products, indicating it might be widespread in the chicken industry. The CDC is not advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked chicken, or that retailers stop selling raw chicken products.

The CDC advises individuals to always handle raw chicken carefully, and cook it thoroughly to avoid contamination. Chicken needs to be cooked at at least 165ºF to kill harmful germs. Properly cooked chicken should not pose a risk of illness. Always wash your hands, utensils, and cooking areas after handling raw chicken. Do not wash raw chicken before cooking. This can cause cross-contamination.

Salmonella Symptoms

  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • In rare cases, Salmonella infection can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.
  • Children younger than 5 years of age, adults older than 65 years of age, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have severe illness.
  • For more information, see the CDC Salmonella website.

To learn more about this outbreak and food safety, check out the CDC’s website.

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